How I Got An Internship In Esports

Daniel Parker and Adam Whyte - Edge Esports

Digital Schoolhouse’s landmark report provides evidence that participating in the tournament can help to not just engage our students with developing their digital skills and broader soft skills, but also enables them to aspire to career pathways that they may not have otherwise considered.

– Digital Schoolhouse

Hi, my name is Daniel, this is my story on how I became part of Edge Esports. I have been a gamer for as long as I can remember, all the way back to playing Crash Bandicoot on the PS1 with my dad. He’d always let me win but it wasn’t long until I started beating him for real. When I was nine I got my own very first console, the XBox 360 and I got really into racing games like PGR4 and playing COD with friends. But it wasn’t until I played Destiny on XBox One that things got serious. I’d never truly understood the depth of gaming, and although Destiny never became a big esport in its own right, I knew then that I was serious about getting into esports.

I was never going to be a pro gamer, but what really interested me was shoutcasting; commentating live on games. I played a lot of Smite, watched all the tournaments and loved the way shoutcasters like Hinduman commentated live with such passion. I knew that’s what I wanted to do, but didn’t know how to get there.

At the start of my college year I got my chance. My lecturer asked me if I would like to be part of a gaming competition which wasn’t just for gamers, but for people who wanted to help in the event such as shoutcasting. The events were hosted by Digital Schoolhouse, an organisation dedicated to bringing kids into the digital age through a variety of workshops. They did a fantastic job in setting up different venues for the competition’s different legs. The event included multiple colleges and schools which allowed a variety of players into the tournament. They also had a great roster of other people involved, recognising esports as a serious industry. There were famous casters, industry agents and professionals and they even made sure the Daily Mail covered the events, showing people unaware of the industry just how beneficial gaming and esports can be.

My first game that I shoutcasted on was the qualifiers that took place in the Game Belong studios in Bristol where all the teams went head to head to finish at the top of the leaderboard at the end of the day. I shoutcasted for a few games in the commentators corner which is where I met Adam Whyte, CEO and co-founder of Edge Esports. The next time we met was the finals for the event which took place in the GFinity Arena in London, which was an amazing venue for the finals of the competition. There I shoutcasted on a panel with a known shoutcaster R2K which was a great honour. I had followed him on his shoutcasts so many times but had never seen his face, so when I realised that I was sitting next to him, my face lit up. On top of this I also won the award for best shoutcaster 2018. This is also where I met Adam for the second time and started to talk about Edge Esports.

After I had completed my exams at college I was straight back into the esports scene when I made my way into London to meet the team at Edge; everyone was super friendly and it was great to get to met everyone after a while as I’m located away from the rest of the team. On the same day I met some representatives from Digital School House and did a short Q&A on the benefits of being part of the team and how it can affect the younger generations lives in a positive way.

By joining Edge Esports on an internship it has allowed me do so many things such as visit amazing venues such as the Red Bull Gaming Sphere and interview some incredible people like Premier League footballer and esports academy owner Christian Fuchs, and marketing manager for FACEIT Clement Murphy. I am grateful for the opportunities that I have had with Edge and glad that I am part of the team.

Without Digital Schoolhouse these amazing possibilities wouldn’t have been available to me and it goes to show how one small connection can develop into something so much greater.